Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Paris Cafe

VANISHED

The Paris Cafe at South Street Seaport is no more. After being in business since 1873 and surviving the numerous trials and tragedies of history, including a comeback from Hurricane Sandy, it could not survive the coronavirus shutdown of the city.



On their Facebook page, they announced:

"To all our wonderful patrons and friends I would like to extend a sincere thanks and a fond farewell from The Paris Cafe. Through no fault of anyone but the outbreak of this virus we are unable to forge a way forward that makes economic sense. We had no option but to close our doors. Hope springs eternal and perhaps with a change in the economic climate we may find our way back. With all our hearts we say thank you for all the fun, friendships and laughter as well as the few shillings spent. My thoughts are with our lovely staff at this time and we would like to thank all who subscribed to our Go Fund Me fund which is gratefully appreciated by staff in need. Our friendships will remain strong and when the grey skies clear we will meet and be renewed."


Lee Remick in front of the Paris Cafe, 1960

(thanks to a different Lee for the tip and the photo)

4 comments:

Unknown said...

Check out photos by Barbara Mensch of Paris Bar:
https://www.robertandersongallery.com/photo/paris-bar-2/

I hate New Things said...

And now with no more Paris Cafe, the area is bereft of its historic restaurants joining Carmine's, Sloppy Louie's, Sweet's and the Bridge Cafe as ghosts of another time. Very sad and depressing.

Unknown said...

Makes no sense. I doubt they'll find a new tenant anytime soon, and whatever newbie moves in will need to establish a reputation. For the landlord, there will be broker fees, leasehold improvement concessions and whatever so they won't make any money either. Ugh!

Manqueman said...

Like nearly everything our elected officials are doing in response to the economic effects of the pandemic, this (and the Gem Spa situation) makes no sense. How forcing a tenant out when it will be a problem to replace them and the pool of prospective tenants will be a lot smaller for a long time to come is ridiculous. Far better to work with the existing tenant to make sure the tenant has a viable business when restrictions are eliminated.