Monday, February 6, 2012

*Everyday Chatter

Bloggers talking about lost New York bars and restaurants. [AMNY]

New York bookshop owners, steel yourselves--Amazon is going brick and mortar. And they're starting in Seattle, where the Starbucks scourge began. [AW]

The "emasculation" of Wall Street--masters of the universe no more. [NYM]

March 9: Check out Networked New York--a conference that "examines relations among writers and artists who commune and clash in New York City." [P&W]

Real estate agents are trying to rename Kips Bay "NoEVil" for North East Village--! [FP]

Tomorrow: A talk on the "Homo High Line" and the role that gay men play in gentrification. [LGBT] [NYT]

Great horned owls take up New York nests. [NYT]

Fantastic photographs of NYC's streets--and this story about a sidewalk clock. [JM]

Foodie culture expands its takeover of Brooklyn. [BP] via [Grub]

Remembering the Charlotte Russe, a lost food of New York. [CNY]

8 comments:

esquared said...

Wall Street and Wall Streeters were emasculated in the first place, that's why they've chosen that path -- to [over]compensate for that emasculation. So, they've just come full circle.

esquared said...

Another lost NY restaurant (well not really a restaurant), Mike's Papaya on Broadway and Church in Tribeca is no more. Signage is gone.

(commented this before, doesn't seem like it went through last week)

JAZ said...

esquared - actually it was on Reade & Church. They had gotten hit with a ton of DOH violation points at a couple of their inspections, but not sure what the actual cause of the closure was. Always seemed kinda empty in relation to the foot traffic on that corner.

Always tasted pretty good to me, and I never had a problem with the food there.

Claribel said...

This excerpt from the AMNY link was worth copying here:

Despite what seems a downward trend, Andrew Rigie, executive vice president for the NYC chapter of the New York State Restaurant Association, says the number of sitdown restaurants registered in the city has remained about the same in recent years - from 15,000 to 17,000.

What has changed, he said, are the owners: individual proprietors shut out by "exorbitant rents and the ever-increasing cost of doing business and increasing regulatory burdens," Rigie said.

"Very few restaurants are fortunate enough to own their own buildings. They operate on razor-thin profit margins - sometimes just four cents on the dollar," Rigie added. "If you see a restaurant with every seat full, it doesn't mean that it's profitable. Popularity does not ensure longevity."

esquared said...

that's what I meant, Reade and Church. thanks, JAZ. food there is affordable too -- 2 for $2 hotdog specials or $4 with a drink.

well, the foot traffic there has changed. it's now more of the Housewives of Tribeca, esp. during mid-day, as opposed to the working class there before. That's a great corner for a Starbucks or Chipotle or a Shake Shack.

Brendan said...

I guarantee the "emasculated" Wall Streeters are still in the 1%.

Melanie said...

Marty was writing about Black & White cookies today and now you are mentioning the Charlotte Russe--wow--love them both. They go back with me to childhood in Brooklyn! There was a great bakery on Utica Avenue that made both,,woo woo

Filmatix said...

Hyperdevelopment on Columbia street has seemed sadly inevitable. What I always liked about that area for years was the big sky mixed with the peace and quiet, a nice place to take a walk or ride and get away from people. Countdown a few months and you'll be stumbling over yapping brunchers in no time.