Monday, June 23, 2008

*Everyday Chatter

Brand-new Carroll Gardens residents hail the drugstores, Subways, and clothing stores that gentrification has brought to their nabe. Yes it is a satire--and a funny one that's scary because it feels so very, very, very real. [Gothamist]

Go deep inside 47 East 3rd, where the writer is also a tenant: "My neighbors and I know that if evicted we cannot afford to remain in the East Village, suddenly full of trendy boutiques and luxury housing. I stubbornly believe the neighborhood will be a less vibrant place with all of us gone." [Gothamist]

If you missed Folsom Street East, check out links to pictures here. [JMG]

I have noticed an increase in crusties lately. Maybe it's just summer, or maybe it's an indication of the improved health of the East Village. Kind of like finding sea turtles in the East River. Kind of. Anyway, enjoy a night with the gutter punks of the EV. [NYMag] via [Curbed]

Listen to the saviors of Coney Island on Brian Lehrer today:



Central Park too? "The struggle for Central Park is, in its essence, like any other New York neighborhood conflict, with the same kinds of seething antagonisms and the same immutable stereotypes. There are the old-timers (I was here first!), the colonizers (The park is ours!), and the new-money arrivistes (Who do you think you are?)." [NYMag]

Take a walk down tired old Nassau and Fulton Streets. [EVG]

Take a look at the misery that was New York, prior to the misery that is New York. Somewhere in between the two, we had a pretty amazing city. [FP]

Say goodbye to the wise men of Cafe Figaro. [GVDP]

2 comments:

knicksbasketballny said...

EV gutter punk says... Suvy calls himself a gutter punk—the closest thing, he says, to the original version.

Hahaha!!!

A whole invasion of out of town wannabe punk rockers.

A whole invasion of out of town wannabe Carrie Bradshaws.

When will we get an out of town invasion of David Berkowitz and Robert Chambers wannabees?

L'Emmerdeur said...

"Take a look at the misery that was New York, prior to the misery that is New York. Somewhere in between the two, we had a pretty amazing city."

This is what folks on both sides of the argument don't get. There should be a balance of new and old. Preserving the old at all costs turns a city into a mausoleum, Stripping any and all old in the name of progress leaves it without a soul.

Why are there so many supposedly intelligent people who don't get this?