Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Record Mart

VANISHED

After 62 years, Record Mart, "the oldest record store in Manhattan," has closed.


photo: Jesse Jarnow

Untapped Cities reports the sad news, “I’d seen them clearing the store out last week but I thought it was because of the fear of looting.” It was not the looting. It was "due to the pandemic," according to a sign on their door, which also reads, "We are moving into the vintage audio business, where we buy, refurbish, and sell audio equipment. Please visit us at recordmartwifi.com to browse our selection, or if you want to contact us to sell your audio gear."

I was last inside Record Mart in December. I worried about it then and bought a few things. I also took this video. A little moment of joy under the ground at Times Square.






5 comments:

DJ ET said...

As a longtime record store shopper, I will miss the unique experience of slipping into this Latin-music landmark to peruse the reissue LPs as the subway crowds rushed by.

For more info on Record Mart's legacy in the NY Latin music movement, check out this great compilation and its liner notes:

https://www.discogs.com/Various-Subway-Salsa-The-Montuno-Records-Story/master/763361

ChippyChompers said...

Shame to see it go, walked many times by it. Always wondered how a place like that maintained its business.

I hate New Things said...

And the scythe continues to cut down iconic places.. Did you also see that Khyber Pass Afghan restaurant on St. Mark's has also closed? It should be a busy year for losing more places, sad.

Unknown said...

the site is actually . . . . recordmarthifi.com

Michael Simmons said...

I always stopped at the Record Mart when I was in the Times Square station in the '70s. They broadcast music so you could hear it walking by. In 1973, I strolled over and was transfixed by a doo-wop song called "Don't Fuck Around With Love" coming from the store's speakers. I went in and bought the 45 and later found out it was recorded in 1953 as a racy joke variant of "Don't Mess Around With Love." I'd play it for friends and they'd flip.

I loved the Record Mart -- the guys who worked there were rock 'n' roll history experts and eager to share their knowledge. One more soulful joint gone.