Tuesday, March 20, 2012

*Everyday Chatter

Keep the Eldorado of Coney Island alive--and "bump your ass off!" [ATZ]

Save Kate's Joint from eviction. [EVG]

The dusty wonders of Phil's Stationery store. [Racked]

See which neighborhoods artists are colonizing next--and was colonization always the goal? [NYT]

The girls of Williamsburg:


Watch the Woody Allen documentary on streaming PBS. [NYO]

The secrets of 666 6th Avenue. [FNY]

A tour of Bob Dylan's Village. [TWM]

"Brooklynized" bottled water is something that exists. And it comes from Florida. [Grub]

March 31: See the Vanishing City at Dixon Place. [DP]

18 comments:

esquared said...

I actually like the "Girls" of Williamsburg.

“Obviously we’re not making a documentary here, and even if we were, it would be hard to make it honest. No, it’s not “Sex and the City,” where it’s a total lie. That’s four gay men sitting around talking”.

Its premise looks promising: Ms. Dunham, 25, the show’s creator, plays Hannah, a post-college Brooklynite with big if uncertain ambitions, a perpetual lack of money and a coterie of friends with personal lives as jumbled and complicated as her own.

Unlike, the scary sadshaws, which was a fantasy and hyper-reality, this looks more in touch with reality of life in Williamsburg, albeit with the annoying high-pitched valley girl talk of the millenials (but I've accepted this as a genrational thing). And Williamsburg nowadays is populated with these types of girls anyway.

esquared said...

P.S. As for the which neighborhood is the artists are colonizing next -- Far Rockaway. [they beat me to it, I probably wouldn't be able to afford it now.]

#goodday

the Grumbler said...

says the Girls creator, "“Sex and the City,” which I grew up on and completely respect..."

Jeremiah Moss said...

from the Observer:

"In one episode, a character brings cupcakes to an abortion clinic for an impromptu party; another character is portrayed as a dolt for being obsessed with Sex and the City (she calls herself a Carrie)."

http://www.observer.com/2012/03/is-hbo-all-out-of-luck/3/

Anonymous said...

Though I don't necessarily agree with the tone here all the time, I do find this site interesting and come here frequently. I used to live in NYC but have since moved back to Texas-it's funny that I almost feel like I find more small local businesses and oddities here in Austin than I do in NYC (though I do want to get back to NYC for a visit very soon.

Anyway, I just read this article and thought of you...

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/arts-and-lifestyle/2012/03/bmw-guggenheim-cancels-its-berlin-exhibition-amid-threats-violence/1552/

Jeremiah Moss said...

nicely done Berlin! thanks for the link, i just posted it.

Crazy Eddie said...

@esquared-“albeit with the annoying high-pitched valley girl talk of the millenials”. My advice to them is as follows. If you are going to define yourself by living off the bloated dead carcass of a previous decade, can you please pick another one besides the 80’s to do so? Believe me, I was there, it was not pretty. And if I hear the word “like” one more time, my frigging head will explode.

Anonymous said...

I too am completely flummoxed by the ascension of the Valley Girl accent as the prime accent of the Elite Youth of New York. And what makes it doubly strange is that it isn't even used to just convey the lackadaisical attitude of a bona fide Valley Girl. It's also become the standard corporate voice. It's the voice of MONEY in every realm of MONEY, replacing the old aristocrat accent which was pretty snazzy.

I know it's also used by indifferent hipsters who try to look like they don't have money but it's the accent for Money now and I just don't get it. It must be the Rodeo Drive in New York Sex & the City complex.

When I was a kid, I hated the working class New York accent. To me, it was the accent of bums that I knew personally. All the Scorsese movies in the world couldn't glorify it to me. But now it's music to my ears.

esquared said...

I don't know why I'm defending the Girls, but yes, the creator may be a fan of SATC but not all SATC fans are scary sadshaws (as much as I dislike SATC too, there are some out there who admire the show -- they saw it for what it is, a fantasy and escape, unlike Bushnell and SJP who sold it as a reality or documentary -- but hate the scary sadshaw that it had spawn). The character that Dunham created is maybe indeed a scary sadshaw in the show, but at least there's some sort of self-awareness in it and probably be making a mockery of her. She seems willing to make fun at a scary sadshaw (a term that Emily Gould coined as "for thirtysomething ladies who walk four abreast down cramped sidewalks on their way to drink colorful martinis and muse about their lovelives", which I think is an anti-SATC and makes the Carrie Bradshaw paradigm far less annoying. I can tolerate and forgive that self-awareness.

#whocaresesquared

Jeremiah Moss said...

esquared, i can be open to these Girls. it's just that i've been having a lot of trouble interpsychically with mainstream young women in the city--the only ones i encounter (or notice) seem to be screaming, vicious beings. i would love to experience another kind.

esquared said...

I too long for a conversation from or to hear a Holly Golightly or Whit Stilman's girls, but unfortunately the girls around nowadays are either born with that Valley Girl voice, or they're just doing it, as anon. 10:30 am said, to give the impression of having money -- truthfully or ironically.

But these screaming vicious girls are more concentrated in the EV because of what the neighborhood has become, that is, the proliferation of bars and the mallification of it, thus it seems like most girls one encounters are what one would encounter at a sorority house or a mall -- the girl with that whiny voice. I've accepted it as long as they are girls or young women. They're here and they will not disappear. What I still hate, though, are the scary sadshaws -- the 30 somethings who sound and act like they're still girls.

I think I just went through Kübler-Ross's 5 stages of grief over the SATCification of NYC -- denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and finally acceptance.

Jeremiah Moss said...

well said esquared. i'm still bouncing between anger and depression. never been much good at denial. as for acceptance, i'm working on it.

Brendan said...

All this was pleasing, and so was the way she had shyly slipped into calling him "Frank," and so was the news that she did indeed have an apartment with another girl--a "perfectly adorable" apartment right here in the Village--but after a while he found he had to keep reminding himself to be pleased. The trouble, he guessed, was mainly that she talked too much. It was also that so much of her talk rang false, that so many of its possibilities for charm were blocked and buried under the stylized ceremony of cuteness. Soon he was able to guess that most if not all of her inanity could be blamed on her roommate, whose name was Norma and for whom she seemed to feel an unqualified admiration. The more she told him about this other girl, or "gal"--that she was older and twice divorced, that she worked for a big magazine and knew "all sorts of fabulous people"--the more annoyingly clear it became that she and Norma enjoyed classic roles of mentor and novice in an all girl orthodoxy of fun. There were signs of this tutelage in Maureen's too-heavy make-up and too-careful hairdo, as well as in her every studied mannerism and prattling phrase--her overuse of words like "mad" and "fabulous" and "appalling," her wide-eyed recitals of facts concerning apartment maintenance, and her endless supply of andecdotes involving sweet little Italian grocers and sweet little Chinese laundrymen and gruff but lovable cops on the beat, all of whom, in the telling, became stock supporting actors in a confectionery Hollywood romance of bachelor-girls in Manhattan.

-Revolutionary Road, Richard Yates, 1962

(If you've read the book you know Frank isn't so hot either.)

bennyg said...

I liked Entourage, 4 nyc guys who left the hood of queens to help achieve stardom in hollywood of one of the main characters named chase. I always wanted to leave nyc and move out west like those guys in Entourage. On the flipside I hope the show GIRLS about four nyc transplant girls living life after college in williamsburg brooklyn flops. I wonder if all four female characters use iphones and type off of macbooks.

Jeremiah Moss said...

re: those Girls, the creator says, "this show couldn't exist without Sex and the City both because of the place it carved out for women on TV, and also the fact that it's probably the reason most of these characters moved to New York."

esquared said...

I know I'm obsessing over Girls but, yeah, I read that too and Frank Bruni's not so flattering piece on the show and its creator.

I think I'd still prefer Lena Dunham's realism (or today's realism because of and after SATC)to SJP's hyperrealism, nonetheless, if that makes any sense at all...

esquared said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
esquared said...

Girls better than SATC and the characters in the former are actual people in today's NYC. It's difficult to garner up sympathy for most of the characters, nonetheless. Much like SATC and Gossip Girls, Girls is based on a very specific social set, thus, I'll be sticking with Mad Men on Sunday Nights.